An Unfortunate Mixup

As a PR professional it is important to fact check stories and graphics before publication. In the entertainment industry, it is common for tabloids to publish fake stories, but for major publication’s, release false information can be damaging to the celebrity and publication’s reputation.

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Total Beauty’s Tweet on Feb. 28, 2016. Source: CNN article covering this new story; cnn.com

At the 2016 Oscars, Total Beauty was tweeting celebrities’ dresses from the Red Carpet. They tweeted a picture of Whoopi Goldberg and called her Oprah. People immediately reacted and the tweet was taken down within a few minutes. Numerous news sources including CNN covered this story: Total Beauty Mishap

 

So Why is this a Problem?

Well for starters, Total Beauty should not have tweeted a celebrity without knowing her name. But also, this is a racial issue because whoever was tweeting thought the two women looked alike. Many twitter follows called the publication racist.

 

Total Beauty’s Response

Total Beauty issued an apology through Twitter saying, “We’d like to apologize to Oprah and Whoopi, as well as everyone we’ve offended. It was our error, and there are no excuses. We’re sorry.”

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Total Beauty’s Apology. Source: Total Beauty’s Twitter Page

Then, they followed up by saying they would donate $10,000 to Oprah and Whoopi’s respective charities.

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Total Beauty’s Tweet following the Apology. Source: Total Beauty’s Twitter Page

 

Whoopi and Oprah’s Responses

Luckily for Total Beauty, Oprah and Whoopi both brushed this mix up off as a joke. Oprah poked fun at the publication on Instagram. Whereas, Whoopi said it was a mistake. “I feel pretty good if you’re comparing me to Oprah. Saying I look like Oprah, that’s not a bad thing,” Whoopi said on The View the following morning.

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Oprah’s joke about Total Beauty’s Tweet. Source: Gayle King’s Instagram

What I have learned from this

It is fair to say that I will make mistakes a professional, but it is easy to avoid mistakes like this one if I fact check and make sure I’m 100% certain my story or post is correct. Part of my Editor’s Credo says, “I promise to look at the content and accuracy of the information and quotes of my stories.” By following this, I will avoid major problems.

However, should I make a mistake like Total Beauty’s tweet, I need to take full responsibility and apologize right away. Although Total Beauty received some backlash, it was not nearly as harsh as it could have been. I think both celebrities brushed it off because of the apology and the donation.

 

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Political Puppies

Last week, my class went to the Newseum in Washington, D.C. and I was surprised by how much I enjoyed the day. To be honest, I was dreading this trip because all my friends were doing fun summer things at school.  After I saw the ‘9/11’ exhibit on the second floor I actually began to enjoy the museum. I then I went to the ‘Ethics’ exhibit, which then led to me reading a teleprompter.  I pretended to be a newscaster at The White House. Believe it or not, reading a teleprompter is a lot harder than it seems.

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Picture taken by Emily Lisanti at the Newseum. Photo features (from left) Jill Schreider, Aimee Buck, Katie Perry

 

For my Future:

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Picture taken by Katie Perry at the ‘First Dogs’ exhibit in the Newseum

Part of the reason for going to this museum was to see how it would relate to my future career.  Obviously I would like to end up in Public Relations, so I tried to see which exhibits relate to the field. At first, I immediately thought the ‘Ethics’ exhibit would relate best to my future job, but then I saw the exhibit of the ‘First Dogs’. Since I am obsessed with dogs, this area immediately caught my eye. It does not seem like an exhibit that would relate to a PR professional, but it does. Public Relations professionals do not only deal with news releases and crisis management, but also with image. It is extremely important for Public Relations professionals to make sure the people or company he/she is working for maintains a positive image.

As I was looking through the First Dogs, I started looking at the presidents differently. I saw how cute President Nixon’s dog was (a Cocker Spaniel named Checkers). I immediately had a lot more sympathy for President Nixon after seeing a picture with Checkers. I realized how an animal could change the image of a famous figure, specifically a president. The White House website lists the First Dogs, but the Newseum gives pictures and explanation of the most famous ones.

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Picture taken by Katie Perry at the Newseum

 

 

Although I may never work for a president, this exhibit helped me realize how simple things, such as animals, can easily change the image of a person and that is extremely important to remember now and at my future job.

 

I am glad I was able to experience the Newseum especially because I did not think I would enjoy it. It was educational, but also a lot of fun.

 

 

Sources:

http://www.newseum.org

http://www.whitehouse.gov